Companies and businesses all follow values and mission statements to guide their employees. It serves as their drive and purpose everyday, as well as assisting them to be on track for the company’s goals.

However, these values and mission statements don’t often match an employee’s thoughts about their jobs and career goals. Some employees may even think these goals don’t support their career development.

If you are struggling to keep up with your company’s vision and mission, here are some factors that can help you find your inner purpose in work:

Know what inspires or interests you

One of the major reasons why a person struggles to be active in work is because it is not their calling. It is not the work that captures their attention and makes them happy.

Ask yourself what things inspire you and start from there. It may even be a way for you to rediscover why you love your job.

You know how much I love inspiring and mentoring people so as a team manager, I get to do that everyday. It never cease to amaze me that if you put a little more faith in someone, the person may just exceed your expectations.

I lost count how many of my ex-team members under my tutorage, went on become great leaders and managers themselves. My only hope is for them to pay it forward!

Recall your past callings or aspirations

Had an old dream you wanted to pursue but never got the chance to do it because of one reason or the other? Did a particular event or situation changed your perspective?

These events or goals can help you open new doors for opportunities and welcome them as a challenge you want to try out.

When I was a teen, I vividly remembered that my mum will always yell at me for hogging the phone line. I’ll be on the phone with my friends well past midnight even on a school night.

One day in the mid of changing my career, I decided to revisit an old passion of mine – talking on the phone. I applied for a call centre position and I have never felt more happier.

Know what can help you with your work

Some positions may be vague when it comes to how you can grow to love it.

Look at your responsibilities and ask if it is important for the company’s growth and development. You should also look into how your work is matching your life goals and if it is not causing problems.

Asking yourself these factors will help you see the value of your work and understand how you can adapt to it.

I seldom stick to my job description. In fact, right after the first week of my new job, I will be exploring ways to make process smoother and to do things easier.

Freelancing as a writer, I don’t only write what my clients tell me to write. I will research and suggest top topics in their industry. I will find out keywords that will benefit their ranking on SEO.

Seek advice from others

If you are the type of person who can’t judge their skills well or denies them, why not ask others for help?

You can ask your family or friends about what kind of things you are good at and get their opinion about the job you should be doing. Take note of their answers and zoom on the ones that gets your interest.

You may even find ways on how you can work well with others and make work great again.

It is important that you have a sounding board and a mentor at work. You can sound out your ideas to him or her. You can vent and let off steam even. I’m very fortunate that I always have a mentor or two at every job I did. These people have looked out for me and helped me to learn about myself than I ever will on my own.

Know what your values are and find inspiration there

At the end of the day, you are the best person to ask about yourself than others. You know yourself better and you know what makes you tick. Take some time to reflect on your values and see how they influence your life.

Conclusion

Work is challenging, especially if it is not the job that calls out to you. If you are unable to find satisfaction in what you are doing, chances are that you will not be able to reach the goals you intended with your career.

When you feel like the job isn’t working anymore for you, take a step back and look at your career so far.

Looking for more articles to find that passion of yours? Here are my recommendations:
12 Things You Can Do Today To Find Your Passion
Is Passion So Hard to Pursue?
Passionate @ Work

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19 replies on “How to Find your Inner Purpose in Work

  1. As I read this I was thinking about a business owner actually trying to get into employee’s head in order to help them feel good about their output. Where is this world heading? Well I guess that it is up to me to figure out.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Master piece! 100% true.I loved this post.Thank you Kally for sharing such informative and valuable post.
    Pl check your mail also and see if can do something about it.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Kally, yet another “Home Run!”

    What an insightful topic.

    I’m sorry you weren’t around when I was working.

    I never once asked a prospective employer for their “Mission Statement” (All though I did attempt to investigate the company). I missed MUCH! (DARN!, hate it when that happens.
    Way to go!

    God Bless, Patrick

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I decided to look around at some of the people I followed but never got a chance to read. Yours is first and I am so glad I did. You made me think. Not so much about work as that is behind me for the most part. Instead, you got me to thinking about how I thought and did at previous jobs and how I view life now. I think I have another blog post thanks to you. Problems is I am too tired now and I forget things so easily. I doubt I remember tomorrow. lol. Doesn’t matter. I thought tonight and realized that I did a lot of the things you talked about. The one thing I didn’t do much was to think about the present moment much. I worked in the present, I mean programming is that exactly, but I was always thinking ahead. That was one of the problems with my first marriage. We lived in the future or the past, not the present. It is truly a “present” to yourself and should be done often. Breathe – pause – how do you feel NOW – breathe – pause – repeat. Wish I had done that.
    Scott

    Liked by 1 person

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