Job interviews are not complete without the question “What are your Strengths?”

Candidates may find this question easy to answer, but you have to be careful to answer it because you may end up highlighting strengths that are not related to the job. Interviewers use this question to see if you are suited for the job and know if you match what your resume says about you.

Down below are some tips to help you answer this tricky yet fundamental interview question:

Know what the company is looking for

If you want to answer this question efficiently, you need to know what the company is looking for. Employers often look for candidates with a good amount of experience, critical skills like leadership, communication and analytical skills and a good background. You can also see what a company needs through the job listing.

When you see what the company needs, list down your skills and strengths and see which ones apply to the job at hand, narrow it down to your most vital skills, and list examples of how you used that skill to improve on something. Some employers will ask you about past experiences and how your strengths helped you in these instances.

For example, if the job requires someone to multitask, tell them the time you manage three projects singlehandedly.

Don’t reveal too much information

While preparing your potential answers to this question, it is important to remember that you should not reveal too much information regarding your other strengths. Some skills may not be required in the job that you are applying for. Remember, you need to focus on your main strengths, which are related to the job.

Instead of giving them a hundred of your strengths, match three strengths to the job scope.

Don’t be too vague with your strengths

Like answering other interview questions, you shouldn’t be too vague if you are asked to provide a list of your strengths. Your answer should be concise and straight to the point, focusing on those which will help you get the job and impress the employer about your skills. Since you are applying for the job, you need to sell yourself for the position.

Don’t exaggerate

Aside from avoiding vague answers, it would help if you also paid careful attention to not being too exaggerated with your response. If you exaggerate your skills, you may only end up making your answer vague and give the employer more reasons to reject you as a potential employee.

Stay humble

Stay humble when you list down your strengths. Employers always want employees who can work well with their co-workers and not cause any issues because of their attitude. If you respond too arrogantly or boast too much, you only give them a reason to ignore you even if your strengths are suited for the job.

Conclusion

If you want to get the job you are applying for, you need to prepare your response and be ideally suited for it. Look into your skills before your interview and see which strengths will help you impress your potential employer. Remember, stay humble, confident and active when responding to this question, and you will be able to show that you are the one they are looking for.

Want to score that interview? Check out these tips:
10 Questions You Should Absolutely Ask an Interviewer
Worst Interview Stories by Recruiters & Managers
Should You Send A Thank You Note After Your Interview?

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16 replies on “Answer That Interview Question: What Are Your Strengths?

  1. 💜 Smart “Interviewers…ask” about weaknesses; because They SEE (Soulful Emotional Energy) The Potential for Improvement

    …💛💚💙…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Too many folks thing “be humble” means “put yourself down.” A better definition is to recognize yourself as an observer would; i.e. admiring a beautiful painting you have done does not mean you are arrogant, just honest that what you did came out beautifully. C.S Lewis said somewhere (something like this that I cannot locate) “Humility is not thinking less of oneself; it’s simply not thinking about oneself.”
    Always wise advice on your blogs! 😉

    Like

  3. Kally, this is sound advice. I’d never thought about matching your strengths with the job’s description, because if you’re a team player, but they’re looking for someone who can work independently, then you may be sending the wrong message.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Good rules to keep in mind! People generally have many strengths, but highlighting one that isn’t useful in a target job or leaving it at one word is unlikely to do candidates any favors.

    Like

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