It is not easy to make decisions whether you are a simple employee or a boss of the company. You will need to consider what is best for the company and not let your emotions or biases affect your decision.

While that sounds simple to do, it doesn’t. There will be situations where you will have to decide the fate of a colleague you have been working with for a long time, and you may even be asked to use a specific style despite your opinion on them.

Fortunately, there are ways to help you make objective decisions at work and here are some examples you can try:

Acknowledge Your Biases And Compensate

Your decisions are not objective if your emotions and biases influence them. To prevent it from affecting your choices, consider your prejudices and take into consideration other factors that may impact your decision.

For example, if you decide how to review your coworker, ask yourself if you know them well and if you have any biases towards them.

When you have all these information, consider them carefully and see your decision. If your decision is influenced by your biases and not consider other options, revise your thinking.

Create A Counselling Scenario

When thinking about your decisions, it is easy to lose track of your thoughts while taking into account its possible outcome and effects. If you can’t speak to someone to help you decide, imagine a counselling scenario in your head and imagine how they would respond to the situation you present them.

You can also imagine how you will react to them when they share their opinion about the topic and use it to help you decide.

Use A Scoring System

You can also use a scoring system to help you pick the best possible decisions for the situation before you. You can assign points to the factors you are considering for the decision and see how each potential decision fares using the scoring system.

Once you have taken a look through all the possible options and their scores, you will be able to narrow down the best decision you can take.

Reduce Your Deciding Factors

If the decision you are making is tough and there are quite a lot of factors to consider in making the best option, why not reduce these factors and consider those that matter?

For example, if you are considering moving to a new company, you can reduce your deciding factors to salary, growth opportunities and work environment.

Own Your Decision

No matter how long we think about a decision and its potential impacts, you will need to decide what is best. While it is ok to take time to decide, you should also consider the time frame you have to make it and stick to that decision.

If there will be consequences to your choices, you can immediately spring into action and work your way in reducing its impacts.

Reaching an objective decision can be tricky as our emotions, biases, and experiences influence it. However, if you apply the right strategies like the ones we listed above, you may create a way to make the best objective decisions you can. Even if that decision doesn’t work as well as you intended, you will still be reassured that you made the best choice, given the situation at hand.

Being productive can yield results that not only bring in wealth but also reduce stress and improve your health. Here are some more articles to help you to achieve that:
Why Are Video Conferences So Exhausting and What You Can Do About it
10 Sure-Fire Tips to Work Productively At Home
Get Your Priorities Right

11 replies on “How to Make Objective Decisions at Work

  1. If there is something I need to speak about concerning something going on concerning my job as a boss, I feel it is only right that I address it. Feelings are involved concerning anything that has to do with your lively hood. Whether it is good, or bad everyone should agree to disagree and move on without any hard feelings.

    Liked by 1 person

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