Some say that if you want to get a raise, the best way to do it is by getting another job offer that has better perks than your current situation.

With an outside offer, you can use it to negotiate with your employers to get better wages and benefits and boost your confidence since your skills are recognized. It also provides you with information your company may not be happy to disclose to you, such as the industry standard for wages. Some can even use the offer as the nudge they need to make the raise request.

However, it would help if you were careful in utilising outside job offers as leverage because your company may see it as an act of disloyalty. It may affect your working relationships with your coworkers and affect your job prospects in the future since the offering company will be asking for a referral from your old employers.

If you plan to use an outside job offer as leverage, here are some things you need to know to make it succeed:

Understand Your Audience

Before you go to your superiors to negotiate, you need to know how they react to your news. If your boss or manager is someone who can get very defensive and see such offers as a sign of disloyalty, you should not attempt to go to them to haggle. You will need to be sensitive to the best route to persuade them to offer better compensation.

Confirm Your Commitment

When you go to your manager, don’t immediately threaten that you will go to another company.

Instead, let them know that you appreciate working for the company and you love the job. You can let your managers know that you checked the other offers to see what else is out there, but you don’t want to take it because of your love for the company.

With the offer, you and your managers can discuss how your current position can be improved so that you don’t have to take the outside offer.

Ask Questions

Aside from reaffirming that you are loyal to the company, you can avoid making threats during the negotiations by asking the right questions.

You can ask what the company will do if you are not there to assist or absent for an extended period. This will let the company know that you can choose how you want your career to go forward.

Ask Someone To Be Your Advocate

You can also consider getting your colleagues or mentor’s help to help you use your outside job offer as leverage. When you talk to them about the offer and ask for their opinion, they can be the ones to speak to your boss and work on ways on how to retain you in the company.

Focus On Other Things Aside From The Salary

Don’t just focus on the salary when negotiating with your company once you have an outside job offer. It would help if you also looked into the other compensation included in the job offer and the benefits you are getting.

You will be able to leverage better if you aren’t focused on the salary but the overall picture. The management will be more open to adjusting your current benefits and compensation as much as they could.

If you feel like your current work compensation and salary is no longer worth your expertise and experience, using an outside offer can assist you in negotiating better wages. However, they do have risks which are why you need to be very careful in using them. Do your research and be discerning with the reactions of the company before proceeding to the next step.

And lastly, remember, don’t burn your bridges.

Facing sensitive work issues? Here are some ways to tackle those problems diplomatically:
10 Ways to Improve Your Workplace Relationships
How to Deal with Sexual Harassment at your Workplace
LBGTQ In Workplace

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16 replies on “How to Leverage an Outside Job Offer

  1. ages ago you covered a story about anger and the soul destroying impact on the angry person and their staff…. if you want another job go for it with the sincerity of actually wanting it and wanting to leave your current job…. recruitment is such a shot in the dark and is, perhaps, one of the most resource wasting activity both employer and prospective employee will do… How does anyone know who you are when you are judged solely on a fraction of who you are ie things you have done in the past and can say, yep, I do that because I have done it before. Requisite Organisation and Requisite Agility are essential in any organisation and any good employer will know you and hang on or encourage development inside or outside their offer. Think impact of self on others. T&C’s are best settled collectively with often arbitrary measures of difficulty and difference (competence) being judged on ROI determinations (resource) and rarely the attributes of an individual employee see 12manage.com for a fuller picture of Requisite Organisation/Agility the Competency abd Resource Based Views of the Firm. Those keen to know more about Adult Development approaches should/could see Otto Laske at the Interdevelopmental Institute… Sadly, research shows that the level of industry standards in this area, world wide, are woefully exaggerated and indeed most success is rather more like a beauty contest with all the inherent discrimination. If anything, don’t let your job define who you are and most employers forget to tell their staff that just turning up each and everyday is of greatest benefit to them.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. your most welcome Kally. it’s not insightful though. it is very 1990-2014ish for a fresh take consider this Complex Society: In the Middle of the Middle World by Bojan Radej and Mojca Golobic (2021) the chapter on Organisation maybe of particular interest. And, if you haven’t already Do sign up for http://www.12manage.com
        the basic search facility is free and access to the detailed, thrown around discussions worth the investment… it knocks LI for six…. and is run by the University of Utrect…its a massive online library.

        Liked by 1 person

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