Word of Advice: Negative Influences

Hello Kally,

I really enjoy your articles especially your weekly wisdoms. I use them as a desktop wallpaper as a motivation for my work. I have a little problem here. Not really a big deal but I thought I might like to share it here to see what your thoughts are and maybe see what your readers think as well.

Just last month, I joined a new team in my department due to some reshuffling. As much as I love being in my old team, the change was inevitable but I have no negative feelings and I think it will do everyone some good with a fresh arrangement. Apparently not everyone thinks like me, some of us really impacted by the move and started behaving negatively. They will disrupt meetings by challenging their new team leader unnecessary or they will group up together and not do certain tasks.

As I have said before I am not really affected by these negative folks and it is not really a big deal to me that they are behaving this way as I just go about doing my job my way. I just can’t wrap my head around why they are behaving this way especially since throughout the reshuffle, there was no one let go or fired. In fact, some of us even got promoted in ranks.

Maybe they are just being ungrateful?

Let me know your thoughts. 🙂

Lots of blessings,
Connor S.


Hi Connor,

Thank you for letting me know how much you love my weekly wisdom. I enjoy creating them as much as you love them as your wallpaper.

You sound like a cheerful dude that I would love to have you as my colleague. Your positivity is simply a burst of sunshine in your company and I’m pretty sure a lot of people love that about you in your workplace and outside of it.

As much as you brush off your negative colleagues, I am confident that you are affected by them as well, even if it is a wee tiny bit. The vibes they sent out during meetings and work vibrates throughout the floor and can create a nasty and awkward atmosphere for someone like you to work in. So you being concern is legitimate.

You can take different path in this. Either get involved and talk to one of them, the one you have most influential power over as a peer and a colleague. Or you can also choose to talk it out with your superior. He or she might not be aware how dire the situation has become and certain necessary action should be taken. As much as anyone has the right to their opinions, they must also understand that they are hired to work in a team and such unnecessary negative will do a lot of damage to everyone who works there. Of course, you can also choose to ignore all this and get on with your job as well. You may want to observe until situation get much worse before you choose to step in.

The choice is pretty much in your hands. You are right in seeing a positive aspect in this reshuffling. I guess there are others who are too blinded by their own agenda to think of the bigger picture.

Always be this positive!

Regards,

Kally@MiddleMe.net

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One comment

  1. “Caution” on the talk it out with your superior…if news get’s back to the resisting parties you might be maligned in ways you never imagined. Most team fallout happens when coworkers don’t talk directly to one another–people start imagining what you said to the boss and imagining your intent. (Of course, this little tidbit comes from my own personal experience, and your advice, Kally, for your readers to evaluate their specific situation is key.)

    Like

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