If you find yourself in between jobs throughout your careers, you may be wondering how you can link them together to help you transition easily.

The solution to your problem is through the help of bridge jobs.

Definition of Bridge Job

A bridge job is a temporary position not related to your chosen industry. You are taking one because you want to support your basic needs, such as your health insurance, medical expenses, and others. You are also not taking on a bridge job permanently; it is just there until your goal for taking one has been met.

Pros of Bridge Job

Aside from being able to help you financially, bridge jobs also offer several benefits that may help you throughout your career, and some of them are as follows:

1. It Helps You Build Your Connections

Since you are taking a job outside your actual industry, having a bridge job will help you meet new people and gain opportunities you couldn’t get in your previous job. Your new connections can even show you avenues in your career journey that you may not have considered before.

2. It Helps You Build New Skills

Bridge jobs can help you learn new skills that you may be able to use in your next career. For example, if you work as a freelance writer while waiting for your dream job, you can transfer those writing skills.

3. It Helps You Restore Your Confidence

Some people are taking on bridge jobs as part of their efforts to get back to work after a short hiatus. During this short break, your confidence levels may be lowered because you haven’t been doing office tasks and may have forgotten how an office environment works. With a bridge job, you will be able to get back into the groove and give you the confidence to pursue your goals.

4. It Helps You Decide What To Achieve In Your Next Job

When you take on a bridge job, you are giving yourself extra time to consider the following options, especially if you want to move forward in your career. You also will be able to visualize what you want your career to go on and which skills you should improve on before making that step.

Cons of Bridge Job

If there is a downside to a bridge job, it is the fact that it should be considered a temporary job. If you are not actively planning to build your career or doing a job search to find your dream job, your bridge job may end up being your permanent job.

If you want to focus on building your career, a bridge job should only be there to support you while you find the best offer for your career goals.

Final thoughts

Bridge jobs may not be everyone’s pot of tea because they may not be the tasks you want to do. However, if you need something to help you with your finances and pursue your interests, having one doesn’t sound so bad.

Just remember that these jobs are temporary, and your focus should be on finding your permanent job. If you let your bridge job affect your focus, it may affect your overall performance in your work. However, a bridge job can also bring out different talents in you that you haven’t discover in yourself before. So never discount the fact that it may open new opportunities for you.

Hunting down the perfect job? Check out these helpful articles to smooth that process:
What Employers Do Not Want to See on Your Resume
Should You Place Your Photo On Your Resume?
5 Key Things You Need To Have In Your Resume

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13 replies on “What is a Bridge Job

  1. The best way to not make your bridge job permanent is to write out the reason you are taking on the position. Once those goals are met it is time to move forward with something else. In other words, focus on the end game!

    Liked by 1 person

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